Top 10 Abstract Artists


abstract artists

An abstract artist is someone who creates art that doesn’t depict objects in the real world. Instead, they use shapes, colors, and textures to express their ideas. Here are 10 of the best abstract artists in the world.

1. Wassily Kandinsky

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Wassily Kandinsky was born in 1866 in Russia and is considered one of the fathers of abstract art. His early paintings were Impressionist-style landscapes. He tried to express himself more fully through his painting, spending all of his time studying the works of great artists and experimenting with various mediums, including woodcuts, lithographs, tempera, and oil paint. Despite numerous attempts to be accepted into the art world (exhibiting in Munich at Der Blaue Reiter), Kandinsky was largely ignored because he was seen as an oddity – a painter attempting to break away from realism. His work became more spiritual over time; by 1911 he had created almost 50 abstract pieces that reflected this change in energy.

2. Piet Mondrian

Piet Mondrian came from a successful background; his father owned an international trading company. Mondrian, however, chose to study art and eventually become one of the most notable abstract artists in history. After several years of painting landscapes in a traditional style, Mondrian began to experiment with abstraction in 1911. He felt that this was the best way to express his innermost feelings and beliefs. By 1916, he had created his first piece of pure abstract art.

3. František Kupka

František Kupka was born in 1871 in Moravia (now part of the Czech Republic) and is considered one of the earliest abstract artists. After training as an engineer, he decided to pursue art full-time and enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague. He became interested in the Bohemian movement, which encouraged artists to paint what they felt instead of what they saw. After two years he moved to Paris, where he met Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque – the pioneers of Cubism. Kupka became enamored with their work and joined them in exploring new ways to express oneself abstractly.

4. Kazimir Malevich

Kazimir Malevich was born near Kyiv and started his career as a painter and stage designer for the theater. By 1913 he had decided to focus on bringing art into everyday life by designing textiles and theatrical sets with shapes that flowed together – an early form of pure abstraction. He worked quickly; refusing to labor over one painting or allowing himself time to develop his ideas. This helped to create an overall feeling of spontaneity in his work. Malevich is best known for painting the Black Square in 1915, which has been called the “zero point of painting” and is seen as a symbol of the beginning of abstract art.

5. Hans Arp

Hans Arp was born in Alsace, France, in 1886. He was interested in art from a young age and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich before moving to Paris in 1910. There he met Wassily Kandinsky and Piet Mondrian and became involved with their circle of abstract artists. In 1916, Arp began creating his own abstract pieces, which were influenced by and Surrealism. Unlike some artists in this movement, Arp believed that abstract art should be completely spontaneous and based on the artist’s subconscious.

6. Jackson Pollack

Jackson Pollack is known for his unique application of paint to canvas; he often let the materials do what they would, dripping or splashing them onto the surface rather than using brushes. He was fascinated with Navajo culture when he was growing up (he had an uncle who worked as a trader in Arizona) and many people believe that this is reflected in his paintings; some see his work as spiritual representations of Native American sand painting. Pollock began by studying line drawing at an after-school program, then enrolled at the Manual Arts School downtown before moving to New York City in 1930 to study with Lee Krasner.

7. Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko was born in 1903 in Daugavpils, Latvia. He and his family moved to the United States when he was 10 years old, and eventually settled in Portland, Oregon. After studying at Yale University, Rothko moved to New York City in 1940 and began working with a group of artists known as the Abstract Expressionists. His paintings are often seen as metaphors for spiritual experiences or states of mind; he once said “I am not an abstractionist. I am not interested in the relationship of form, color, or anything else to external reality.” Rothko’s work has been exhibited all over the world and is housed in many prestigious collections, including the Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

8. Piet Mondrian

Piet Mondrian was born in 1872 in the Netherlands. After training as a teacher, he decided to pursue art full-time and moved to Paris in 1911, where he met other artists who were exploring abstraction. His paintings from this period are based on simple geometric shapes (lines, squares, and rectangles) and a limited color palette. In 1914, Mondrian moved to London and then to New York City in1942, becoming one of the pioneers of American abstract art. His work has been exhibited all over the world and is housed in many prestigious collections, including the Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

9. Yves Klein

Yves Klein was born in 1928 in Nice, France. He first became interested in art while studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Paris, where he met other artists who were exploring abstraction. Klein’s paintings from this period are based on simple geometric shapes (lines, squares, and rectangles) and a limited color palette. In 1954, Klein began working with performance art and soon came up with his own concept called “the void.” For one performance, he had volunteers lie down on a canvas and then drenched them with blue paint; the resulting work was called The Blue Human Condition. Klein’s work has been exhibited all over the world and is housed in many prestigious collections, including the Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

10. Richard Mosse

Richard Mosse was born in 1980 in Ireland. He studied at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, graduating with a master’s degree in 2005. Around this time, he began focusing on photographic journalism, covering conflicts in Congo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. In 2011, he moved to Goma in eastern Congo to continue these photojournalism projects but found that his photographs were being displayed as artworks rather than news coverage; for example, his work documenting the life of child soldiers was exhibited at the Venice Biennale instead of appearing on front pages around the world.

Conclusion

The artists that we have mentioned above are just some of the greatest abstractionists in history, but there are many others whose works can be seen around the world. This might be a very brief overview of abstract art, but hopefully, this has shown you what it is all about and why so many people find it exciting.

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